6 ways to stop your free time being hijacked when you work part-time

 

Working part-time has benefits but also many challenges. Often you are not treated with the respect of a full-time employee, or paid as well. Part timers are often overlooked for promotions and annual pay increases in favour of full- time workers. In addition to this, they are often expected to put in extra hours each week answering emails and dealing with problems during their personal time. This can add up to a big percentage of (unpaid) extra work. Increasingly, the work force is made up of a higher proportion of part-time and freelance workers and it is important that we manage our time carefully to ensure that the way we work is understood, respected and fairly compensated. Here are a few tips to help keep your part-time work part-time and not allow it to eat into your personal time and other projects.

1. Set clear expectations

Explain that you are fully committed to role and will give it your all when working. However, this is a part time role and you have other commitments outside these times. Therefore, you will not always be able to respond to email outside of these times. You understand that there will be times when something exceptional happens that needs to be dealt with, but this needs to be the exception, not the rule. Do not make excuses or apologies which imply that the only reason you cannot respond/ do extra work out of hours is because you are busy with something else. You don’t need to justify why you cannot work, unpaid, on a non-workday.

2. Stick to a clear work schedule 90% of the time

If your job is Mondays and Wednesdays, stick to those days and agreed hours. Avoid taking work home and get everything finished up for the week by the end of Wednesday, so it is already to go next Monday. If you work at home for a set number of hours, then keep your work files in a separate space so that you cannot see them during your personal time. This may be an office, allocated space or even a storage box. Keep it our of sight and out of mind when you are not at work.

If it is impossible to get the work done within your agreed hours then you either need to negotiate some additional paid hours, or edit your workload. Putting in a few extra hours every week is not the solution.

3. Be visible

Make sure that people know who you are and what you do. It is easy to be invisible as a part-timer as you will not attend all meetings and simply are not there every day. So make a point of introducing yourself to colleagues and explaining what you do and which days you work.

4. Do not always be contactable

Your boss may need to be trained that you are not on call at any time of the day or night, so unless the issue is urgent, do not respond immediately out of work hours. If you do, you are giving the message that you are always available and happy to be contacted. Successful boss training requires you to be fair, firm and consistent, much like training a puppy. Most employers will try to get more out of you than the agreed hours. That represents good value for them, but not for you.
Ideally have a separate phone number and email account for work, so that it is separate from your private accounts. If it is too late, and you have already given out your personal email and mobile number, then make sure the phone is switched off most of the time, so that you can respond to voicemail at specific times.
Most email providers now allow you to set rules for specific contacts. Set up auto response for messages received from work during evenings or non- work days saying that you will deal with emails when you are back in the office ( if there is an urgent problem then please send a text). This makes it clear that the message has not been looked at yet, so there is no expectation of an immediate reply.

5. Reconnect at home

To reclaim your evenings and family time you could introduce an evening curfew. A set time when all members of the household switch off their phones and tablets and put them in a box. Switch off wifi too – we can all manage a couple of hours every evening without checking social media. This is also a great habit to get children used to (but adults need to join in too!) They may protest initially, but it will actually be a relief for them. It offers an enforced break from the addiction of social media and notifications, with precious time to reconnect with family.

6. Be a joy to work with!

The real challenge here is to do an excellent job, be positive and yet not have your free time hijacked. You certainly don’t want a reputation as a constant complainer. It is a difficult balance to strike and requires you to be an asset to your employer, but not a door mat. Set clear boundaries with your boss, respect your capabilities and your time and others will too. Never apologise for not being available all the time. You do a great job and you deserve to be recognised and rewarded for your contribution.

 

Photo by Sonja Langford on Unsplash

 

 

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Big Life Tune-Up: Part 3

Future plans for income and location

When I started to think about my vision for future income and location, I realised that I have been through this process many times over the years. I have bought dozens of books, done brainstorming exercises and made vision boards. It has all been quite good fun and inspiring at the time, yet here I still am- pretty much in the same place as I was this time last year ( and the year before). It occurs to me that this is what happens to most people. We buy a new journal and a nice pen and write down everything we want and then put it away in a drawer and get on with the washing up. What makes the difference between the small number of people who make change happen and the vast majority of us who don’t get beyond the ideas stage? Well, perhaps it is the same thing that happens when we buy a new diet book ( but don’t actually change what we eat), or set New Year’s resolutions but don’t make any changes to our modus operandi.

Humans are creatures of habit. We get stuck in a routine. Having new ideas is the easy part – actually changing what we do on a daily basis is much tougher. So if I want to make significant changes in my life that lead to different outcomes (I do), then I need to form different habits. My ideas must be anchored to a specific action plan, with clear daily steps that lead me in a new direction. What is absent from most self- help books is a measurable method. Specific steps to take with tracking and accountability. I am convinced that this is the missing ingredient that has kept me stuck for all these years and has helped to keep the market in self-help and diet books so buoyant. So, using my experience of business planning, I am now building a process which will help to create new habits and hold me to account. Ideas without a plan are just dreams and the time has come to take intentional steps towards a planned future.

Bramblex