6 ways to stop your free time being hijacked when you work part-time

 

Working part-time has benefits but also many challenges. Often you are not treated with the respect of a full-time employee, or paid as well. Part timers are often overlooked for promotions and annual pay increases in favour of full- time workers. In addition to this, they are often expected to put in extra hours each week answering emails and dealing with problems during their personal time. This can add up to a big percentage of (unpaid) extra work. Increasingly, the work force is made up of a higher proportion of part-time and freelance workers and it is important that we manage our time carefully to ensure that the way we work is understood, respected and fairly compensated. Here are a few tips to help keep your part-time work part-time and not allow it to eat into your personal time and other projects.

1. Set clear expectations

Explain that you are fully committed to role and will give it your all when working. However, this is a part time role and you have other commitments outside these times. Therefore, you will not always be able to respond to email outside of these times. You understand that there will be times when something exceptional happens that needs to be dealt with, but this needs to be the exception, not the rule. Do not make excuses or apologies which imply that the only reason you cannot respond/ do extra work out of hours is because you are busy with something else. You don’t need to justify why you cannot work, unpaid, on a non-workday.

2. Stick to a clear work schedule 90% of the time

If your job is Mondays and Wednesdays, stick to those days and agreed hours. Avoid taking work home and get everything finished up for the week by the end of Wednesday, so it is already to go next Monday. If you work at home for a set number of hours, then keep your work files in a separate space so that you cannot see them during your personal time. This may be an office, allocated space or even a storage box. Keep it our of sight and out of mind when you are not at work.

If it is impossible to get the work done within your agreed hours then you either need to negotiate some additional paid hours, or edit your workload. Putting in a few extra hours every week is not the solution.

3. Be visible

Make sure that people know who you are and what you do. It is easy to be invisible as a part-timer as you will not attend all meetings and simply are not there every day. So make a point of introducing yourself to colleagues and explaining what you do and which days you work.

4. Do not always be contactable

Your boss may need to be trained that you are not on call at any time of the day or night, so unless the issue is urgent, do not respond immediately out of work hours. If you do, you are giving the message that you are always available and happy to be contacted. Successful boss training requires you to be fair, firm and consistent, much like training a puppy. Most employers will try to get more out of you than the agreed hours. That represents good value for them, but not for you.
Ideally have a separate phone number and email account for work, so that it is separate from your private accounts. If it is too late, and you have already given out your personal email and mobile number, then make sure the phone is switched off most of the time, so that you can respond to voicemail at specific times.
Most email providers now allow you to set rules for specific contacts. Set up auto response for messages received from work during evenings or non- work days saying that you will deal with emails when you are back in the office ( if there is an urgent problem then please send a text). This makes it clear that the message has not been looked at yet, so there is no expectation of an immediate reply.

5. Reconnect at home

To reclaim your evenings and family time you could introduce an evening curfew. A set time when all members of the household switch off their phones and tablets and put them in a box. Switch off wifi too – we can all manage a couple of hours every evening without checking social media. This is also a great habit to get children used to (but adults need to join in too!) They may protest initially, but it will actually be a relief for them. It offers an enforced break from the addiction of social media and notifications, with precious time to reconnect with family.

6. Be a joy to work with!

The real challenge here is to do an excellent job, be positive and yet not have your free time hijacked. You certainly don’t want a reputation as a constant complainer. It is a difficult balance to strike and requires you to be an asset to your employer, but not a door mat. Set clear boundaries with your boss, respect your capabilities and your time and others will too. Never apologise for not being available all the time. You do a great job and you deserve to be recognised and rewarded for your contribution.

 

Photo by Sonja Langford on Unsplash

 

 

Advertisements

The Big Life Tune-Up: My Career 2.2

 

Well this really has been a week full of insights. Having given a lot of thought to my career, I recognise that I have been stuck in a comfortable rut for years and I have made a bold decision. I am under-stretched and not growing in my career. I should have challenged myself and moved out of my comfort zone many years ago, but I did not. So now I need to put myself under some pressure, otherwise I will have even greater regrets this time next year.

I think many people can fix their career by making some changes within their existing organisation or moving into a similar role elsewhere. In my case, I have come to realise that neither of these options will deliver what I am looking for (a real challenge, sense of achievement and greater earning potential). I have also concluded that re-training for a different career will not work for me at this stage. It will take too long and ultimately will not deliver the lifestyle I am seeking. The conclusion is that I need to develop a business rather than a career.

Within the next five years my aim is to be doing work that is part-time and location-independent, freeing up time for travel with my lovely husband and lots of reading. Life is short and I have made the bold decision to only pursue opportunities that inspire me and have the potential to deliver the outcomes I am aiming for.

My intention is to phase out all my teaching and tutoring within the next two years. I plan to go part time by July 2018, which will mean handing in my notice on March 23rd 2018. It will not be easy, but this decision has really given me a clear focus on what I will and will not spend my time on. I will devote time everyday to fine-tuning ideas for future products and mastering the new digital skills needed. Time spent on anything else that does not support my future intentions, will be kept to an absolute minimum. I will be the Princess of Productivity and have just taken delivery of my marvellous Productivity Planner from Intelligent Change (intelligentchange.com).

Now I have committed, I must deliver and not waste another second. Exciting times – big change is afoot!

Bramblex

 

The Big Life Tune-Up part 2.1

So just as a reminder, here are the bits I am tuning up:-

1. Looks and style

2. Career

3. Income and location

4. Health & Fitness

Next up…my career. Wow, this is a can of worms! This is such a big topic that I am just going to start with what is good and bad about my current situation.

The good things about my career…

1. I work with ( mostly) nice people.
I am a specialist teacher so I spend a lot of time with children, which suits me in many ways.

2. I work in a lovely environment. Two different schools, both in historic buildings with stunning grounds.

3. The school day fits around my son’s, so I can drop him at school and pick him up.

4. I get the school holidays off

So far, so perfect….however, here are the bad bits

1. There are no prospects of being promoted or increasing my income ( which has pretty much flat-lined for the last few years). I have accepted this whilst my children have been at school as the price I pay for something that fits around them. However, my eldest is now 18 and off to university and the younger one is nearly 16. I have now spent 18 years in a comfortable but essentially dead-end job and it is time for a shake-up.

2. I am not being challenged or learning much that is new. I do not feel satisfied or valued and it feels like I am taking the easy option.

3. I need to ( and want to ) earn a lot more money. My costs have increased year on year whilst my salary hasn’t. In addition my costs are about to go up again to fund my son’s living expenses whilst he is at university. Apart from that, if I had remained in my previous career then I would be earning more than double my current salary. Does that hurt? Yes. Was it my choice? Yes. Does that mean that I have to stay where I am with no earning ambition? No! But this is not going to be easy. I make no apologies for wanting to earn a lot more (even though I am British). I am fed up with people thinking that there is something worthy about accepting a salary that you are not happy with and does not recognise years of experience. Us women are particularly good at that…hence the gender pay gap.

4. It is really important to me to I feel like I am on a successful path and that I do something new. I am soon to become an empty-nester and I do not want this to feel like the end of the line, but rather a new beginning..the re-invention of me!

So I know what I want…a much better income, more of a challenge and to feel successful. But achieving that seems a huge mountain to climb ( and I am not even quite sure which mountain I should be climbing). Somehow find a way to progress in my current sector (education), move to a new sector with re-training or start my own business?

Further thoughts and decisions coming soon…good luck to everyone who is re-inventing themselves. It is hard work, but exciting too.

Bramble xx

Finding your life goal

 

There is a fascinating book by Angela Duckworth called ‘Grit’, which I am reading currently. Having seen her TED talk, I wanted to find out more about what it really takes to excel in your chosen field and it is refreshing to hear that it is attitude rather than CAT scores that really count. Working in education, it is saddening to see the number of children who feel like they are failing because they do not score highly in written tests, which really only test a very narrow version of true intelligence. Who is in a position to define intelligence anyway? Is being able to remember facts and write them down a measure of intelligence ( or just a good memory)? If having original ideas is valued then how is this measured in the education system? If I can demonstrate my knowledge and ideas through a conversation, but what I write is a poor version of what I know, then why is my intelligence measured by the written version? ( answer: because it is much easier to administer). Many talented people have been let down by the education system which has given them a grade which they then have to carry through life. Those who decide the grading system and the grades may be the best administrators, but they are not the best thinkers. Anyhow, I digress….education is my hobby horse. What I wanted to discuss was goals.
The key to success is having a clear goal, life purpose or mission statement (ideally just one). This then guides everything you do and all your mini and midi goals fit into the overriding goal. This seems obvious, but how many of us apply it? Not me so far, but I will from now on.
Problems arise when you either have a vague high level goal (‘ I will be rich’) but no plan to achieve it. This ‘maxi goal’ is not connected to any midi or mini goals beneath it. When I was younger I just had this vague idea/hope that I would be rich enough to retire by 30 ( ha!) but this was not backed up by a plan or specific actions. I then proceeded to get a job in marketing that, at best, would mean a reasonably comfortable life on the treadmill, but certainly would not lead to a fortune. How did I think this would ever join up to my master plan of being rich and free?
The other problem is having no clear ‘maxi’ goal and then just bumbling along doing tactical tasks on a daily basis, without any idea how these are taking you closer to your goal. They do not join up to your key purpose, so you may be busy but you’ll never get there. Maxi, midi and mini goals need to join together in a pyramid all working to take you to your one, most important life goal. This should be a long-term goal, not something you keep changing. Food for thought! Well it is for me and a very interesting insight from Angela Duckworth. Good luck with finding your life goal, it may just be the most important thing you do.

5 ways to find your passions

 

It sounds ridiculous at the age of 49 to not know what you like and who you are, but I suspect I am not alone in not having a clear picture. There is often an assumption that we all have a passion and have known what it is from infancy. This is not true for me and I am guessing that I am not the only one. After all, our lives are intertwined with many others and it is easy to stop being a separate entity. We are not all prima donnas and many of us blend in and play a supportive role in the lives of our family rather than forging our own strong identity. Women, in particular, often end up taking a back seat whilst putting their children centre stage and then feel lost when they fly the nest. Now is the time for self-discovery and navel gazing!
Of course I have some idea of who I am, but I have decided to have a personal review and understand what motivates me and perhaps what my ‘brand’ is ( or could become), so here are 5 ideas for gaining clarity.

1. Personality Tests.

There are some excellent personality tests available online ( many of them free). I used to be quite sceptical of this type of thing many years ago, but after doing a Myers Briggs profile whilst working, I changed my mind. I was impressed with it’s accuracy and insight-so I decided to do it again. I found a free version on truity.com and it shows me as an ENFP ( very similar to the first time I took it many years ago except I am a little more of a ‘feeler’ rather than ‘thinker). But how is this helpful? Well it basically means that I like people, new ideas, creativity, change and am a little disorganised rather than a planner. Looking for a new or refined career or business, I should take these characteristics into account to find a good match. The site also suggests suitable careers by profile. This profile explains why I do not like working alone, in administration roles or with ‘jobs worth’ people. I love new ideas and have a bit of a butterfly mind. So the Myers Briggs profile has reminded me about my motivations, strengths and weaknesses. It has also made me think about how I interact with other people and roles that I should seek out or avoid.

2. Your Bookshelf

So what other clues are there about what we are naturally drawn to? My interests seem to change on a daily basis, but there are some common themes when I look at my bookshelves. This can be quite helpful if you feel that your mind is in a whirlwind and there is no consistency. In my case it’s entrepreneurship, positive thinking, health & nutrition and herbal remedies/aromatherapy.

3. Previous Job Roles

Can you identify common themes in your previous job roles. Thinking about specific tasks or projects. What did you enjoy? Hate? Which people and environments motivated you and which did you find draining? In my case I enjoy working in teams of innovative, creative and imaginative people who have original ideas and a great sense of humour. I am drained by rigid administrators who like to fill in forms and tick boxes – but I understand that these people have skills that I don’t.

Environment is very important to me, I would hate to work somewhere with no windows or views. I enjoy problem-solving and hate routine tasks. Oddly, I am good at creating efficient systems to deal with boring tasks ( so I don’t have to spend time on the boring tasks). It can be very enlightening looking back over your career, remembering when you flourished and when you didn’t and then really trying to understand why. Even in what seems like a disparate working life, you will be surprised at the common factors that come to light.

4. Ask your friends and family

Now I am British and this type of thing is not easy for us Brits. It feels self-obsessed to ask others what they think you are good at and ideas for avenues to pursue, but if you can do it, you may get some invaluable feedback.

5. Do something new

If all else fails ( and even if not), just start doing some new things. Actually doing them, not reading about them! if we are not careful, it is easy for our lives to become narrower the older we get. We believe we have found the best way of doing things, the best places to go, the best things to eat and we stop trying new things. Do not let this happen! You will have to fight to stop it because it is a natural process, but it makes for a gradually duller life. Try new things. Be curious.

Good luck with discovering your passion, talents and building your brand. Life is a series of adventures and I hope you enjoy yours.

Project “what next?”

IMG_0066

Most of us will meet a crossroads in our lives when we have to take a new direction, probably more than once. There are a few key times when this may happen and I am currently at the ‘children leaving home’ crossroads, struggling to find and commit to a new plan. I have been going round in circles for many months flitting from one idea to the next, but not moving forward with any of them.

Part of the problem is just not knowing what will work and what won’t. Which ideas are realistic and which are just vague dreams? There is no established route in this which will lead me through from concept to successful outcome, rather I am having to create my own path with little guidance.

I have been trying to understand why I remain stuck in a loop and I think one of the problems is not treating it seriously enough as a project. If I ever have 5 minutes to spare I might grab the iPad and start randomly looking at ideas, but on reflection that is just not enough for such an important decision.

So, for the next 4 weeks I am going to build in specific times for research and create more structure. I will dedicate at least an hour at a time (ideally 2) and I will allocate this time in my diary. I will choose the right environment for these meetings with myself- a library or coffee shop ( but not at home). I have decided to structure the project by asking myself 5 big questions:-
1. Who am I?

I should already know this at my age (49), but really it is not something I have given much thought to in the last few years whilst I have been absorbed by family life. What are my strengths/weaknesses, likes/dislikes, key roles? What am I good at?

2. What are my likes and dislikes?

What makes my heart sing ? How do I want to spend my time, with whom, where? What do I want to eliminate /reduce in my life?

3. What are my goals?

What do I want to achieve in the next 1 year/ 5 years? What would success look like for me?

4. In terms of career/business does what I am doing now have the potential to reach my goals?

How would what I am doing need to change to meet my goals? Do I need to refine my existing career/business or start with a blank sheet? What are the opportunities for me which would match my skills, personality and for which there is a demand?

5. What new skills/training do I need to meet my career/business goals?

Verify the necessity and value of further training and find courses. Which new communities could I join to help me move into this new world?

I am starting work on question one right now! Good luck with your own search for success and happiness.

What am I like?

As a child of the seventies, it was never about me. The grown-ups ruled the roost and there was little interest in understanding the personality of a child or what they enjoyed. This was not unusual, it was just how it was in the seventies. Our parents didn’t put themselves out to accommodate our needs or interests, as parents do today, we just had to work around the adults. When it was time to go to university I was not taken to any open days (were there even any open days?) and was given very little guidance about what to good with my life. The upshot was that I ended up doing a degree that I wasn’t really interested in and not doing very well. But, as I say, this is just the way things were and, at the time, I didn’t feel short-changed.

The point is, that it was never about me. I had a few years of a good career after university, but then the past eighteen years have really been all about my family. The career is a distant memory, discarded in favour of a ‘convenient’ job that would fit around the children. My eldest is about to leave for university and I am suddenly faced with myself, my limited achievements and a gaping void ahead of me. Finally, it is going to be about me, but that terrifies me as I realise that I have no idea what I like, what I am good at or what an earth I am going to do next. I can see that over the next 12 months I am going to be confronted with myself and that is not an appealing prospect. I will either emerge like a phoenix from the flames or shuffle into old age, unremarkable and unnoticed. It is finally about me, whether I like it or not, and I need to find the strength to pursue the phoenix option, even though at the moment I can’t see how I will get there.